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Q: Should I get rid of unwanted Facebook friends?

By April 4, 2013 February 4th, 2019 2 Comments

Bill wrote in with this question: “I’ve got some serious concerns about who’s ‘friending’ our Facebook page. For example, what are the potential motives of us being linked to an element that appears to have nothing to do with our business? Can they hijack our brand? Should we de-activate our Facebook page?” Great question, Bill. Here are some of our thoughts.

The short answer

There’s really no need to worry about it. Facebook is a public venue (which is the point), and anyone can “like” your page. They can’t “takeover” or otherwise “steal” your brand by doing so. It’s worth keeping an eye on things, but at this point, we wouldn’t worry too much about it. You can, of course, delete your page or ban users. But, we’d advise against that unless you have a solid reason to do so.

The longer answer

Today, your business is more accessible than ever before – and that’s a great thing! It means that your message, products and services can reach a huge audience. In fact, it’s expected that people be able to find, follow and “like” you online. In many cases, not giving them the opportunity to do so creates a negative perception of your company’s brand.

On social media, anyone can follow or “like” your company. That’s part of the beauty of it. Although most of your Facebook fans will likely be within your target audience, you will have some that will not be. It’s okay. It’s not a bad thing. Think about it this way. If you had a billboard on a busy highway targeted at parents of teenage drivers, would you expect that only they (the parents) see that billboard? Probably not. Parents would notice it more so than any other group, but others would see the billboard, as well. No harm, no foul.

Final thoughts

Put yourself out there. In today’s world, it’s necessary. People are looking for you on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and a variety of other social media platforms. You don’t need to be everywhere, but you do need to have presence somewhere in that space. So, stop worrying and start engaging!

This question came from Bill. Thanks, Bill!

Author Monika Baraket

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